I’m always being asked, “What’s coming next?” In Massachusetts, we’ve seen time and time again that yielding to one radical ideology leads to a push for another. This is especially true for the LGBTQQIP2SAA community that endlessly tries to hijack more letters of the alphabet (and now numbers).

In 2004, Massachusetts became the first state to impose the redefinition of marriage. In 2010, the Boston Globe January 3rd cover was titled “BEYOND MONOGAMY” and paired the cartoon with images of individuals in multiple relationships. Only four years later, Massachusetts claimed another milestone for “progress” when the world’s first lesbian threesome “married.”

Since then, “polyamory” has become the newest frontier for the radical sexual revolution. On Valentine’s Day 2019, NPR dedicated airtime to “Polyamory On The Rise.” Last summer, the New York Times published the story of a complicated four-member relationship. Even more concerning, the American Psychological Association recently established the Consensual Non-Monogamy Task Force to promote “awareness and inclusivity” for those who practice polyamory (and to “reduce theological barriers often separating sexual minorities from the source of their beliefs”).

But polyamory seems so far out and fringe, it can’t really be that popular, right? Wrong. Today’s numbers estimate 4-5% of people in the U.S. are engaged in polyamorous or open relationships; that’s more than the 3.5% of Americans who identify as LGBT. So, to answer your question, it’s not “what’s coming next;” it’s what’s already here.

Just this past week the popular HGTV show House Hunters featured a polyamorous “throuple” searching for a new home in Colorado Springs, CO. Angelina, the woman who joined her already legally married partners, Lori and Brian, and their two children said, “Buying a house together as a throuple will signify our next big step as a family of five, rather than all four of them plus me.”

In a recent Men’s Health article, four reasons were suggested for why polyamory (and the several other non-monogamous relationship styles) were on the rise amongst millennials:

1)      Children who have grown up in broken homes

2)      Young people leaving organized religion

3)      Dating apps (greater convenience/access)

4)      Polyamorous representation in media

Ironically, I would argue that these are also reasons for an increase in non-monogamy; however, I arrive at a completely different conclusion. While the article portrays these societal changes as beneficial to a sexually “free” lifestyle, we know the truth about sexual relationships outside the bounds of traditional marriage and the damage that lifestyle causes.

About five years ago, I was debating the issue of same-sex “marriage” on WBZ’s Nightside with Dan Rae, and I argued that polyamory would be the inevitable next step down the slippery slope if marriage was redefined. My opponent accused me of “fear mongering,” but here we are. Sometimes it is less a slope and more like a cliff! 

MFI is dedicated to helping families through raising awareness on these issues and equipping people to defend their own parental rights, free speech and religious liberty. We have to preserve the ability to speak and live God’s truth and pass it on to our children and our neighbors.  

Strong communities of faith are made of strong families. Our prayer is that as we fight to defend the family, we will promote healing and restoration, and help lead millennials back home again.

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